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Did Jesus Really Descend to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?
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Did Jesus Really Descend to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?

Introduction

The question of whether Jesus Christ descended to hell between His death and resurrection is a topic that has been debated for centuries in Christian theology. While some biblical passages may suggest that Jesus did indeed descend into hell, others are not so clear.

This blog post will explore the available evidence from the New King James Version of the Bible to determine if Jesus truly descended to hell after His crucifixion.

In this post, we will examine key takeaways and delve into various biblical passages to better understand the complexities of this theological question.

We will also discuss the implications of the different interpretations and their impact on the overall understanding of Christ’s work on the cross and His resurrection.

Key Takeaways

  1. The Bible contains passages that suggest Jesus descended to hell, but others are less clear.
  2. Understanding the original language and context is crucial to interpreting these passages.
  3. The Apostles’ Creed, an early Christian statement of faith, includes the assertion that Jesus descended to hell.
  4. Different interpretations have various implications for understanding Christ’s work on the cross and His resurrection.
Did jesus really descend to hell between his death and resurrection?

Examining the Biblical Passages

Ephesians 4:8-10

Ephesians 4:8-10 is often cited as evidence that Jesus descended to hell. These verses state, “When He ascended on high, He led captivity captive, And gave gifts to men. (Now this, ‘He ascended’—what does it mean but that He also first descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is also the One who ascended far above all the heavens, that He might fill all things.)” (NKJV).

This passage tells us that Jesus descended to the “lower parts of the earth” before ascending to heaven. Some theologians interpret this to mean that Jesus descended to hell in order to liberate those who were held captive by sin and death.

1 Peter 3:18-20

Another passage that is often referenced in this debate is 1 Peter 3:18-20, which says,

“For Christ also suffered once for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive by the Spirit, by whom also He went and preached to the spirits in prison, who formerly were disobedient, when once the Divine longsuffering waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared” (NKJV).

This passage indicates that Jesus, through the Holy Spirit, preached to the “spirits in prison.” Some believe that this refers to Jesus descending to hell and preaching to the souls of those who had died before His crucifixion.

Acts 2:27 and Psalm 16:10

In Acts 2:27, the apostle Peter quotes Psalm 16:10, stating, “For You will not leave my soul in Hades, Nor will You allow Your Holy One to see corruption” (NKJV).

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Some interpret this verse to mean that Jesus’ soul descended to Hades (or hell) after His death, but was not left there because He was resurrected.

However, it is important to consider the context and original language of these passages. The Hebrew word for “Hades” in Psalm 16:10 is “Sheol,” which can refer to the realm of the dead or simply the grave.

In this case, the passage could be understood as saying that Jesus’ body would not decay in the grave because of His resurrection.

The Apostles’ Creed

The Apostles’ Creed, an early Christian statement of faith, includes the phrase, “He [Jesus] descended into hell.” While this creed is not part of the Bible, it represents an early Christian understanding of Jesus’ work between His death and resurrection.

It is important to note that the phrase “descended into hell” was added to the Creed in later centuries and was not part of the original version.

Different Interpretations

There are different interpretations of these passages and the concept of Jesus descending to hell. Some argue that Jesus descended to hell to triumph over Satan and release the souls held captive there.

Others believe that Jesus’ descent to hell is more symbolic, representing His victory over sin and death through His crucifixion and resurrection. Still, others contend that Jesus did not descend to hell at all but remained in the tomb until His resurrection.

Historical Views on Jesus’ Descent to Hell

Throughout history, various Christian theologians have held different views on whether Jesus descended to hell between His death and resurrection. These perspectives have evolved over time, reflecting the development of Christian thought and the interpretation of biblical texts.

Early Church Fathers

Many early Church Fathers, such as Irenaeus, Tertullian, and Augustine, supported the idea of Jesus’ descent to hell.

They believed that Jesus descended to hell to free the righteous souls held captive by Satan, thus fulfilling the prophecy of Isaiah 61:1, which states,

“The Spirit of the Lord God is upon Me, because the Lord has anointed Me to preach good tidings to the poor; He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to those who are bound” (NKJV).

Reformation and Post-Reformation Period

During the Reformation period, theologians like Martin Luther and John Calvin held differing views on Jesus’ descent to hell.

Luther maintained that Jesus descended to hell to proclaim victory over Satan and liberate the captives, while Calvin believed that Jesus suffered the torments of hell on the cross, rather than descending to hell after His death.

In the post-Reformation era, theologians continued to debate Jesus’ descent to hell, with some arguing for a literal descent and others suggesting a more metaphorical or spiritual interpretation.

Implications of Jesus’ Descent to Hell

Understanding whether or not Jesus descended to hell between His death and resurrection has significant implications for the Christian faith.

This debate touches on essential aspects of Christ’s work, such as the extent of His atoning sacrifice, the nature of His victory over sin and death, and the hope of salvation for all humanity.

Atonement and Victory

If Jesus descended to hell, it would suggest that His atoning work extended beyond the cross, reaching into the depths of hell to liberate those held captive. This perspective emphasizes the comprehensive nature of Jesus’ victory over sin, death, and Satan.

Hope for the Dead

The belief that Jesus descended to hell to preach to and redeem the souls of those who had died before His crucifixion offers hope for the salvation of all people, regardless of when they lived.

This view emphasizes the universality of Christ’s redemptive work and the accessibility of His grace to all who believe.

Conclusion

The question of whether Jesus descended to hell between His death and resurrection is a complex and debated topic in Christian theology.

Examining the biblical passages from the New King James Version, as well as historical views and theological implications, provides evidence for different interpretations.

Understanding the original language and context is crucial in discerning the meaning of these passages.

While some theologians and early Christian creeds assert that Jesus did indeed descend to hell, others argue that these passages should be understood differently.

Regardless of the interpretation, the central message of Christ’s victory over sin and death remains a cornerstone of the Christian faith.

Ultimately, believers must consider the available evidence and prayerfully seek understanding from the Holy Spirit to navigate the complexities of this theological question.

As with many aspects of faith, the focus should remain on the transformative power of Jesus’ sacrificial love and His triumphant resurrection, which brings hope and salvation to all who believe in Him.

As we reflect on the biblical passages, historical perspectives, and theological implications surrounding Jesus’ descent to hell, it is essential to remember that the core message of Christianity is rooted in the love, grace, and mercy of God.

Christ’s work on the cross and His resurrection provide the foundation for our faith, and our understanding of these events should ultimately lead us to a deeper relationship with God and a greater appreciation for the sacrificial love of Jesus.

In conclusion, whether or not Jesus descended to hell between His death and resurrection remains a debated topic in Christian theology.

Regardless of one’s perspective on this issue, the central truth of Christ’s redemptive work and His victory over sin and death should be the focus of our faith.

As believers, we are called to embrace the love of God, exemplified in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and to share this love with others as we seek to grow in our understanding of the mysteries of our faith.

Pastor duke taber
Pastor Duke Taber

Pastor Duke Taber

All articles have been written or reviewed by Pastor Duke Taber.
Pastor Duke Taber is an alumnus of Life Pacific University and Multnomah Biblical Seminary.
He has been in pastoral ministry since 1988.
Today he is the owner and managing editor of 3 successful Christian websites that support missionaries around the world.
He is currently starting a brand new church in Mesquite NV called Mesquite Worship Center, a Non-Denominational Spirit Filled Christian church in Mesquite Nevada.